6 glasses that changed the world. How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World by Steven Johnson 2018-12-23

6 glasses that changed the world Rating: 7,3/10 1530 reviews

A History of the World in 6 Glasses

6 glasses that changed the world

And that was Thomas Edison. It became the most popular soft-drink in the world and symbolizes what was good about America. And this book is definitely worth listening to, but my disappointment is with the incomplete nature of the book, mostly in the spirits section. Beer is the first, and obviously, the least well-documented, since it This got recommended at Lunacon at more than one panel I was at. This is actually not so great, as the book ends up talking about beer without ever mentioning Germany, and wine without ever mentioning France or California. In fact, aren't we looking for water on Mars before we migrate there? Unfortunately, the health effects of soda are not discussed. These are traditions with very ancient origins.

Next

Summer Reading Honors 9 & 10

6 glasses that changed the world

In the late 1970's James Burke hosted a television show called Connections in which he demonstrated how one innovation led to another in a seemingly unrelated way. Wine was a key part of a symposium. John Reader's narrative on the role of the potato in world history suggests we may be underestimating this remarkable tuber. Although coffee originated in the Arab world, it stoked revolutionary thought in Europe during the Age of Reason, when coffeehouses became centers of intellectual exchange. As the centuries went by, early cultures continued to brew and enjoy beer.


Next

A History of the World in 6 Glasses (Audiobook) by Tom Standage

6 glasses that changed the world

Another problem is that the research does not appear to be very deep and so some of the factoids don't seem to be true. Though this might mean a better economy, more human rights, and better education, it also might mean exploitation, corruption, and cultural oppression—just as Coke is sugary and delicious, but also incredibly unhealthy. Coca-Cola spread quickly part because they just sold the syrup and the druggists loved it. When the colonies were founded, there was no initial source of alcohol and the colonists were left drinking water. The runaway growth of Chicago would have never been possible without the peculiar chemical properties of water: its capacity for storing and slowly releasing cold with only the slightest of human interventions.

Next

The World in a Glass: Six Drinks That Changed History

6 glasses that changed the world

Scientists don't really know what drives the difference in the sex ratio in most cases, although China's is a fact. Great Britain tried to ban the importation of molasses from the French islands to the American colonies, which would have raised prices and limited supplies, because the molasses from the British islands was not only inferior but insufficient for the amount of rum drunk. It prevents hangnails and may even aid in cases of boanthropy, the bizarre and often mistaken belief that one is a cow. Infants benefited too, since the antibacterial phenolics in tea pass easily into the breast milk of nursing mothers. A Venetian merchant provided a small sample for inspection, and Clement decided to taste the new drink before making his decision. Interestingly, half of them contain no alcohol! The Tea Party is more of a lesson in the dangers of ties between government and business than a pat anti-tax catchphrase. Johnson ties it together with some general observations on how innovations occur.

Next

How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World by Steven Johnson

6 glasses that changed the world

Both technologies can be seen to have largely impacted the speed and transmission of information and both were widely criticised by some, due to their perceived negative consequences. John Pemberton invented and sold the earliest version of Coca-Cola, which contained both the leaves of the cocoa plant and the seeds of the kola plant. What is more important is that the information shared in the book ensures long relaxing discussion on a Sunday afternoon with friends and family. Beer making advanced with such discoveries as keeping on using the same tub made better beer -- it would contain yeast from the last time. · How did beer determine social class status? So overall, I loved it. Sometimes many inventors wo Fascinating! It was first noticed by ancient Greeks, who saw the static charge when you rubbed an object against fur. For instance: the ancient old tea culture of the Chinese which was only discovered hundreds of years later by the Brits, changed the latter's foreign policy forever; brandy and rum, developed from the Arabian knowledge of chemistry , inspired the age of Exploration; Greeks spread their influence through their exports of wine all over the world.

Next

A history of the world in 6 glasses (Book, 2005) [comicsstation.be]

6 glasses that changed the world

Finally, though carbonated drinks were invented in 18th-century Europe they became a 20th-century phenomenon, and Coca-Cola in particular is the leading symbol of globalization. The archives of Bastille were the offenders were placed, has hundreds of reports saying the offense was speaking too freely in a coffeehouse. To the use of tea as a way to stay hydrated in England, the city was packed full and the water was not the cleanest. Rum was very cheap much cheaper than brandy because it was made from leftover molasses as opposed to expensive wine, and rum was also stronger, which satisfied the colonists. Johnson does an amazing job of explaining complex paradigm shifts in technology and culture, blending different elements into a cohesive narrative. Jak sam twierdził, nie pisał dla fachowców, lecz zwykłego człowieka, który pragnie wiedzieć więcej.

Next

Book Review: Tea: The Drink That Changed the World

6 glasses that changed the world

It proved to be much cheaper than the ingredients for alcohol. Not too much can really be said. On the other hand, the complete teetotaler is disagreeable and more fit for tending children than presiding over a drinking party. The book is well illustrated, moves at a rapid clip and is an amusing and educational read. But the pope had the final say.

Next

Book Review: History of the World in Six

6 glasses that changed the world

Edison shows two things in his carbon filiment invention: first, he improved on an existing technology that had the potential to change the world, but lacked a certain aspect. These scholars were building on knowledge from Greek, Indian, and Persian sources in other fields such as astronomy, mathematics, and medicine, and they also refined and popularized the technique of distillation that led to the creation of new drinks. สนุกมาก รับรองวาเมืออานจบแลวเวลาจะดืมเครืองดืมเหลานี จะมีมุมมองทีเปลียนไป และเราจะพยายามสัมผัสรสชาดของมันมากขึน พอๆกับนึกถึงประวัติความเปนมาของมัน สนุกมาก รับรองว่าเมื่ออ่านจบแล้วเวลาจะดื่มเครื่องดื่มเหล่านี้ จะมีมุมมองที่เปลี่ยนไป และเราจะพยายามสัมผัสรสชาดของมันมากขึ้น พอๆกับนึกถึงประวัติความเป็นมาของมัน I read about this book and was interested in the concept. An Edible History of Humanity is a pithy, entertaining account of how a series of changes---caused, enabled, or influenced by food---has helped to shape and transform societies around the world. But that is when mortality was the highest overall, and if one looks at specific outbreaks like the great cholera epidemic of John Snow fame, it was specifically the beer drinkers who were spared.

Next