Description of scrooge. SparkNotes: A Christmas Carol: Stave One: Marley's Ghost 2018-12-21

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A Christmas Carol Stave 1 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

description of scrooge

The opening establishes not just the friendship between Marley and Scrooge but also Scrooge's fundamental aloneness—it's not just that they are friends; they are each other's only friends. A frosty rime was on his head, and on his eyebrows, and his wiry chin. No stranger ever asked Scrooge the time as, although they did not know him, it was as if they knew he would not help. Allegory, a type of narrative in which characters and events represent particular ideas or themes, relies heavily on symbolism. This means that however bad the weather conditions were they never compared to how cold Scrooge is inside, which is a very powerful statement. After Fred departs, a pair of portly gentlemen enters the office to ask Scrooge for a charitable donation to help the poor. So far all qualities of Scrooge have been negative and so it continues.

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A Christmas Carol

description of scrooge

Scrooge confronts Bob Cratchit, complaining about Bob's wish to take a day off for the holiday. He is not afraid of the dark, though. It mentions The cold within him froze his facial features, so it portrays that its not the weather affecting Scrooge its how cold he is inside. He also mentions that Scrooge had not been thinking about his late partner Marley. The ghost sees a vision of Tiny Tim's crutch in a fireplace corner.

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A Christmas Carol Description Of Scrooge , Sample of Essays

description of scrooge

Scrooge is especially disgruntled when Fred mentions his wife, for example. This is not just a tale of one man's redemption; it is a kind of call to arms for all people to take to heart. But if Scrooge chooses not to listen to these visitors, there is no hope for him. He is cursed to roam the Earth in chains because he mistreated the poor and hoarded his money during his lifetime. Then Marley floats out through the window. He carried his own low temperature always about with him; he iced his office in the dogdays; and didn't thaw it one degree at Christmas.

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SparkNotes: A Christmas Carol: Stave One: Marley's Ghost

description of scrooge

Scrooge refuses to hear anymore. In this case, Scrooge represents greed, apathy, and all that stands in opposition to the Christmas spirit. After rushing to his room, Scrooge locks the door behind him and puts on his dressing gown. This is because a lot of us are still interested in the afterlife and if such things as ghosts even exist we are fascinated by them and a novel with ghosts in, we cannot put it down. He sees a throng of spirits, each bound in chains. He keeps his office cold, not even heating it at Christmas time.

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Describe Scrooge's character in stave 1 of Christmas by Charles Dickens. How does the author convey this character to us? Describe how Scrooge's character changes, concentrating on two incidents from the rest of the novel.

description of scrooge

Part of the lesson that Scrooge must learn is that life is short but regrets are long and haunting, and have an affect even after death. He realizes that his actions as well as his words had upset people and established him as a mean person to others. Cold Is As Cold Does Check out our first description of Scrooge: Hard and sharp as flint, from which no steel had ever struck out generous fire; secret, and self-contained, and solitary as an oyster. Scrooge starts to think about what he had said to people to make them upset and not visit his grave. The fact that there are three spirits and that they will arrive at the same time for the next three nights creates a definite, easy structure for Scrooge, and the story, to follow. Scrooge asks for comfort, but Marley cannot give any. Here comes Shmoop to the what-on-earth-is-that-terminology? A ghostly image in the curves of the knocker gives the old man a momentary shock: It is the peering face of Jacob Marley.

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Describe Scrooge's character in stave 1 of Christmas by Charles Dickens. How does the author convey this character to us? Describe how Scrooge's character changes, concentrating on two incidents from the rest of the novel.

description of scrooge

The opening section also highlights the novel's narrative style--a peculiar and highly Dickensian blend of wild comedy note the description of Hamlet a passage that foreshadows the entrance of the ghosts and atmospheric horror the throng of spirits eerily drifting through the fog just outside Scrooge's window. Everything is as it should be, everything simply furnished and a saucepan of gruel on the stove. It is, in a sense, a Christmas miracle. Marley warns Scrooge that his fate could become like Marley's. The book tells how the spirits, from the past, present and future influence Scrooge for the better and change his personality.

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A Christmas Carol

description of scrooge

For one thing, Scrooge is a moneylender, meaning he makes money without actually producing anything of substance because his income comes from interest on the loans he gives out, not from selling goods to others. The smoldering ashes in the fireplace provide little heat even for Bob's tiny room. It's hard to pinpoint the exact moment when this happens, since the ghosts don't spend a lot of time talking about how you gotta go out there and buy stuff to make the whole thing go. Marley's questions and Scrooge's answers about the senses are important. It mentions how no one ever approached him to see how he was or what he was doing, he had such an effect on the public that they never even thought to approach him.

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Ebenezer Scrooge in A Christmas Carol

description of scrooge

Solitary, which means alone, is a strong adjective to use. Two gentlemen call next, asking Scrooge which one of the two partners listed above the door he is. Charles Dickens continues with the theme of weather by finishing the paragraph with roughly, The heaviest rain and snow often came down handsomely and Scrooge never did. The house was partly given over to offices of merchants, Scrooge lived only in a part of it. As the day passes, the fog and cold become more severe. Marley is affronted at this phrase. This is the very beginning of the book, where the character of Scrooge is described for the first time.

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A Christmas Carol

description of scrooge

Inside the office, Scrooge watches over his clerk, a poor diminutive man named Bob Cratchit. The Ghost of Christmas Past takes Scrooge on a journey to show him specific scenes from his past, including his lonely boarding school days during Christmas and the time when his fiance leaves him. Scrooge thought he had a bad childhood but he didn't it was that he just didn't want to remember it. He is large in size and wears a wreath of holly with icicles. Ghost of Christmas Present The Ghost of Christmas Present is next. However at the end of the novel we see dramatic changes in him as a trio of ghostly visitations causes a complete change in him.

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A Christmas Carol Description Of Scrooge , Sample of Essays

description of scrooge

The ghost of Jacob Marley right paying a visit to his former business partner, Ebenezer Scrooge; illustration by John Leech for Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol 1843. They wail about their failure to lead honorable, caring lives and their inability to reach out to others in need as they and Marley disappear into the mist. Scrooge-onomics Versus Dickensianomics So, with all that lofty stuff in mind, let's turn back to Scrooge. But, to Dickens—who wasn't too up on the facts of how modern capitalism actually functions and mostly relied on his gut—creditors were the people who sucked the poor dry and then condemned them to wretchedness. The ghost wears a white tunic and holds a branch of fresh green holly in its hand. Marley really makes things clear for Scrooge. Lastly, he implores Scrooge to remember what he has said, and, with his eyes fixed on Scrooge, walks backwards as the window behind him slowly opens.

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