The commodification of childhood. The Commodification of Childhood: The Children's Clothing Industry and the Rise of the Child Consumer by Daniel Thomas Cook 2018-12-23

The commodification of childhood Rating: 8,9/10 375 reviews

The Commodification of Childhood

the commodification of childhood

Because Cook relies on sources that privilege adult perspectives--advertising and dry goods trade journals, women's magazines, and parenting magazines--children's voices and experiences are absent. In this revealing social history, Daniel Thomas Cook explores the roots of childrens consumer cultureand the commodification of childhood itselfby looking at the rise, growth, and segmentation of the childrens clothing industry. An interesting take on the development of the view of the child consumer, though I think Cook could have expanded more on the marketing of youth culture from the 80s on instead of focusing so heavily on the early 20th century. Lisa Jacobson University of California, Santa Barbara. Cook's analysis is intriguing as it sets the tone for contemporary child consumerism.


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The Commodification of Childhood: The Children's Clothing Industry and the Rise of the Child Consumer: comicsstation.be: Daniel Thomas Cook: 9780822332688: Books

the commodification of childhood

He discusses various ways that discursive constructions of the consuming child were made material: in the creation of separate childrens clothing departments, in their segmentation and layout by age and gender gradations such as infant, toddler, boys, girls, tweens, and teens , in merchants treatment of children as individuals on the retail floor, and in displays designed to appeal directly to children. Cook provides excellent reviews of the literature on the invention of childhood. While The Commodification of Childhood contains many important insights, it also contains its share of flaws. It will prove instructive to scholars in sociology, history, cultural studies, and marketing. The pediocular approach is more than just one that is child-centered. By the 1930s, advertisers bypass parents and target children in their own right.

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Daniel Thomas Cook. The Commodification of Childhood: The Children's Clothing Industry and the Rise of the Child Consumer. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press. 2004. Pp. x, 211. $21.95Reviews of BooksCanada and the United States

the commodification of childhood

The book is well organized, well documented, and well written. Ultimately, The Commodification of Childhood provides a compelling argument that any consideration of the child must necessarily take into account how childhood came to be understood through, and structured by, a market idiom. As publisher of the trade journal Infants' Department, George Earnshaw played a pivotal role in pressing retailers to devote floor space and specially trained salesclerks to children's departments. Contents: Introduction -- A brief history of childhood and motherhood into the twentieth century -- Merchandising, motherhood, and morality : industry origins and child welfare, 1917-1929 -- Pediocularity : from the child's point of view -- Reconfiguring girlhood : age grading, size ranges, and aspirational merchandising in the 1930s -- Baby booms and market booms : teen and subteen girls in the postwar marketplace -- Concluding thoughts. Marketing to children is tricky business. Cook describes how in the early twentieth century merchants, manufacturers, and advertisers of childrens clothing began to aim commercial messages at the child rather than the mother. It is a must-read for those interested in children and consumer culture, and it has general significance for the history of childhood.

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Daniel Thomas Cook. The Commodification of Childhood: The Children's Clothing Industry and the Rise of the Child Consumer. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press. 2004. Pp. x, 211. $21.95Reviews of BooksCanada and the United States

the commodification of childhood

Only one factory specialized in children's clothes before 1890, and mass merchandisers often stocked children's clothing with adult clothing in various departments throughout the store. But marketers increasingly pitched their goods to a child's viewpoint rather than a mother's. This strategy first gained traction in infants' departments, which courted the loyalty of mothers by hosting talks about infant care and staging baby contests during the U. Please check the credit line adjacent to the illustration, as well as the front and back matter of the book for a list of credits. The argument is most persuasive when the author supplements the trade journal articles that form the bulk of the source material. Well-trained salesclerks treated children as equals and avoided any hint of condescension.


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The Commodification of Childhood: The Children's Clothing Industry and the Rise of the Child Consumer. Daniel Thomas Cook, The Journal of Popular Culture

the commodification of childhood

He discusses various ways that discursive constructions of the consuming child were made material: in the creation of separate children's clothing departments, in their segmentation and layout by age and gender gradations such as infant, toddler, boys, girls, tweens, and teens , in merchants' treatment of children as individuals on the retail floor, and in displays designed to appeal directly to children. By recognizing that children possessed personal desires and stressing the importance of personality development, childrearing advice also helped legitimize the practice of giving children a greater say in their own clothing. Often brilliant and usually provocative as well, Cook sets a high bar for interdisciplinary studies of children as culture-creators and the cultural construction of childhood as morally contested terrain. Just what is a child? He discusses various ways that discursive constructions of the consuming child were made material: in the creation of separate children's clothing departments, in their segmentation and layout by age and gender gradations such as infant, toddler, boys, girls, tweens, and teens , in merchants' treatment of children as individuals on the retail floor, and in displays designed to appeal directly to children. And is it appropriate to direct advertising to children as if they are capable of making consumption decisions?.

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The commodification of childhood : the children's clothing industry and the rise of the child consumer (Book, 2004) [comicsstation.be]

the commodification of childhood

He discusses various ways that discursive constructions of the consuming child were made material: in the creation of separate children's clothing departments, in their segmentation and layout by age and gender gradations such as infant, toddler, boys, girls, teens, and teens , in merchants' treatment of children as individuals on the retail floor, and in displays designed to appeal directly to children. Daniel Cook's thought-provoking examination of the children's clothing industry in the United States sheds new light on the development of children's consumer culture in the twentieth century. Locating teen departments far from baby departments and next to the college shop appealed to teenage girls who studiously avoided appearing too young and often took their fashion cues from college-aged women. On the basis of his detailed and fascinating examination of children's clothing marketing through the twentieth century, Cook constructs a larger template for understanding the complex and evolving relations between consumers and marketers. The Commodification of Childhood: The Children's Clothing Industry and the Rise of the Child Consumer. I have to have it! Title of the journal article or book chapter and title of journal or title of book 3.

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The Commodification of Childhood: The Children's Clothing Industry and the Rise of the Child Consumer by Daniel Thomas Cook

the commodification of childhood

He also focuses on a very narrow albeit well Journal The Journal of Popular Culture — Wiley Published: Aug 1, 2006. In painstaking detail in some places, Cook shows how the growing clothing industry increasingly shaped the fixtures, floor plans and overall design of children's stores to be oriented to kids' viewpoints rather than the mothers'. The E-mail message field is required. Cook's sources are trade journals and he makes good use of these sources, but some case studies of particular companies might have strengthned his argument. This led the mother to consume out of maternal duty to her child. Daniel Thomas Cook The Commodification of Childhood: The Children's Clothing Industry and the Rise of the Child. The child consumer is a particularly powerful figure in the marketplace because children are generative — they grow into adults and produce more children ensuring capitalists values are passed on to new generations.


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The commodification of childhood : the children's clothing industry and the rise of the child consumer (Book, 2004) [comicsstation.be]

the commodification of childhood

Cook also sidesteps an analysis of the class dynamics that shaped children's consumerism. Cook provides excellent reviews of the literature on the invention of childhood. It will prove instructive to scholars in sociology, history, cultural studies, and marketing. In this revealing social history, Daniel Thomas Cook explores the roots of children's consumer culture-and the commodification of childhood itself-by looking at the rise, growth, and segmentation of the children's clothing industry. Cook situates this fundamental shift in perspective within the broader transformation of the child into a legitimate, individualized, self-contained consumer.

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